Advocate

Vision Zero

Vision Zero is the goal to reduce all traffic fatalities to zero. Oregon Walks has been working on bringing Vision Zero to Oregon since 2013. This page highlights our work on this campaign and opportunities to get involved.

Pedestrian Safety Enforcement Mini-Grants

Oregon Walks' Pedestrian Safety Enforcement Mini-Grants program can help Police and Sheriff agencies throughout Oregon improve pedestrian safety by educating community members on Oregon’s crosswalk laws through pedestrian safety enforcement actions.

Write a Letter to the Editor


Write a letter in response an article concerning the issue you're interested in when it's featured in your local newspaper.

Keep it short and on one subject. Many newspapers have strict limits on the length of letters and have limited space to publish them. Keeping your letter brief will help assure that your important points are not cut out by the newspaper.

Attending a Town Meeting


Find out who your legislator is: http://www.leg.state.or.us/findlegsltr/

A legislator holds town meetings to provide a public forum for discussing timely issues or to hear what their constituents are concerned about. The town hall setting provides an effective opportunity to voice your concerns to your lawmaker, especially if there is a large turnout.

Testifying Before a Legislative Committee


The committee process provides legislators more opportunity to closely study a measure than would be possible in a floor debate. If you feel strongly enough to come down to Salem and talk, come on down! Anyone can speak in Salem.

It is important that you know your audience, know the issue, and are familiar with the committee process. Below are some tips for making your presentation successful.


Writing a Letter to an Elected Official


Find out who your legislator is: http://www.leg.state.or.us/findlegsltr/

Writing a letter to your elected official is one of the easiest ways to convey your thoughts and concerns on a land use issue. Writing a letter does make a difference because when an elected official receives numerous letters on a specific issue, it influences their vote. Here are some tips on how to write an effective letter to an elected official.

Use your own stationary. A neatly typed letter on your own stationary is the best presentation.

Meeting with an Elected Official

Find out who your legislator is: http://www.leg.state.or.us/findlegsltr/
 

If you have a strong story worth sharing, maybe it's best to meet in person! Remember, keep your message succinct.


Requesting a Meeting
Arrange a meeting in advance with the appointment secretary/scheduler.

Provide the names of attendees and the topic.

Make sure they know that you are a constituent.



 

Preparing for the Meeting


Calling an Elected Official


Find out who your legislator is: http://www.leg.state.or.us/findlegsltr/
 

Here are a few helpful tips to consider when calling your elected official.

Identify yourself as a constituent and give your name and address.

Define the issue with a specific bill number and name.

Acknowledge the legislator (or staff person) by asking about their position and requesting their vote in your favor.

Show respect by listening to them and thanking them.

How You Can Influence Legislation

Call your legislators to learn their position on specific bills and to articulate your position.  Learn more about caling an elected official.

 

Write to your legislators and tell them about specific bills you support or oppose, and why. Use letterhead if possible.  Learn more about writing an elected official.